The meaning of US military pins

U.S Military pins are a special way to represent US troops.  Whether it’s the traditional American flag pins or military pins has become a common expression of patriotism and allegiance. This has become a common sight in American culture.

During the Civil War, Officers in the U.S. Military, will wear a lapel pin to represent a rank or unit. The military asked the soldiers to wear a brass pin with their unit number, In order to allow everyone to distinguish between different units, it is also used to build loyalty among the members of each unit. By the time World War I,the lapel pin process had changed. Instead of having everyone wear on one, they provide individuals for exemplary service on the battlefield. In the U.S. Military, the lapel pins has become a status symbol, and everyone tells a different story about who possesses them. Later, a series of lapel pins were used in the ceremony and were given to the loved ones of the fallen soldiers. From the Army pins, the Navy pins, the Marine Corp pins, to the Air Force pins, their significance to the person receiving the lapel pins was great honor and pride.

After the end of the war, this previously unintended influence was not reduced. Military personnel can wear military lapel pins to add a unique feel to their dress blues. They can also be worn as a special accessory for any dress or suit. As part of any outfit, the lapel pins can also be worn daily, to proudly demonstrating support and loyalty. So the Soldiers and civilians can also wear it with great pride.

The United States Armed Forces is the military force of the United States of America. It consists of the Army, the Air Force, the Marine Corps, the Navy, and the Coast Guard. The US military pins is authorized by the United States Armed Forces. Each of the five military services maintains a separate series of lapel pins.

military pins

 Below is some information about the military pins:

Army pins:

  • The first unified professional army in American history.
  • US Army logo, is one that displays a white star outlined in yellow, with black accents.
  • The Army pins approval in 1974, represents the Army seal and American flags. In 1975 was engraved on the lapel pin

Air Force pins:

  • The Air Force symbol is – the “Arnold” wings and star
  • It was established in 1947, and is the youngest branch of the U.S. military.
  • Currently has over 320,000 active duty personnel.

Marine Corps pins:

  • The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor is an emblem used to represent the Marine Corps.
  • “Semper Fidelis” (“Always Faithful”) is the motto of the Marines Corps.
  • Currently has over 190,000 active duty personnel.

Navy Pins:

  • The world’s first established elite troops, was established in 1775.
  • Navy core values are “Honor, Courage, Commitment”.
  • Navy logo, It features an eagle, with its wings spread.
  •  It has 282 deploy-able combat vessels and more than 3,700 operational aircraft

Coast Guard Pins:

  • They are the smallest branch.
  • It was first established in 1970, Its motto was ” Semper Paratus.”
  • Currently has over 44,000 active duty personnel with over 1,900 boats available.

GS-JJ can offer inexpensive military lapel pins that are great looking and will fit almost any budget. Don’t forget we can also provide you with  Custom Lapel PinsCustom LanyardsCustom Baseball Trading Pins,  Custom Medals, Custom Belt BucklesCustom Challenge CoinsCustom OrnamentsCustom Embroidered PatchesCustom KeychainsSilicon Wristband and MORE  ……!  We have our own unique automated quotation system. That means we can help make your ideas a reality!  Visit our website www.gs-jj.com or by emailing Info@GS-JJ.com.  You can also call 1-888-864-4755 toll-free.

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